Triangle: Remembering The Fire from Warner Bros.

From Emmy® – winning filmmakers Marc Levin and Daphne Pinkerson, this 40-minute documentary recounts the horror of March 25, 1911, when young garment workers perished in the worst industrial accident in New York City history (up until 9/11), triggering widespread reforms and ushering in the birth of modern labor movement. In addition to riveting stories of heart break and courage told by descendents of several of the fire’s victims and survivors, the documentary explains how the tragedy occurred in the wake of an earlier strike (initiated by Triangle employees) that unified some 20,000 garment workers, but ended violence and few concessions by labor leaders. The Saturday afternoon fire, in which workers were literally locked inside their workspace by management apparently worried about theft, galvanized the public’s outrage against big business and its treatment of employees. It also forced Tammany Hall officials to work with the fledgling International Ladies’ Garment Workers’ Union (ILGWU) to enact legislation improving safety, conditions and wages for garment workers – a trend that climaxed in New Deal reforms twenty years later, and is the foundation of today’s labor standards.

So Well Remembered from Warner Bros.

Lost Horizon. Goodbye, Mr. Chips. Random Harvest. To these James Hilton novels that became acclaimed and beloved films, add So Well Remembered. John Mills heads a distinguished cast in this story of a dedicated news editor in a slum-ridden English mill town and his doomed marriage to the beautiful, headstrong daughter (Martha Scott) of a corrupt mill owner. Spanning the years from the end of one world war to the end of the next, So Well Remembered captures the sweep of history and the power of reform through the emotionally charged lens of personal lives. That’s author Hilton’s voice you hear in the film’s eloquent narration passages. Edward Dmytryk (Tender Comrade, Murder, My Sweet, The Caine Mutiny) directs.